The Meaning of Freedom: And Other Difficult Dialogues

The Meaning of Freedom: And Other Difficult Dialogues By Angela Y. Davis Robin D.G. Kelley, The Meaning of Freedom And Other Difficult Dialogues What is the meaning of freedom Angela Y Davis life and work have been dedicated to examining this fundamental question and to ending all forms of oppression that deny people their political cultural
  • Title: The Meaning of Freedom: And Other Difficult Dialogues
  • Author: Angela Y. Davis Robin D.G. Kelley
  • ISBN: 9780872865808
  • Page: 154
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Meaning of Freedom: And Other Difficult Dialogues By Angela Y. Davis Robin D.G. Kelley, What is the meaning of freedom Angela Y Davis life and work have been dedicated to examining this fundamental question and to ending all forms of oppression that deny people their political, cultural, and sexual freedom In this collection of twelve searing, previously unpublished speeches, Davis confronts the interconnected issues of power, race, gender, class, incarceWhat is the meaning of freedom Angela Y Davis life and work have been dedicated to examining this fundamental question and to ending all forms of oppression that deny people their political, cultural, and sexual freedom In this collection of twelve searing, previously unpublished speeches, Davis confronts the interconnected issues of power, race, gender, class, incarceration, conservatism, and the ongoing need for social change in the United States With her characteristic brilliance, historical insight, and penetrating analysis, Davis addresses examples of institutional injustice and explores the radical notion of freedom as a collective striving for real democracy not something granted or guaranteed through laws, proclamations, or policies, but something that grows from a participatory social process that demands new ways of thinking and being The speeches gathered together here are timely and timeless, writes Robin D.G Kelley in the foreword, they embody Angela Davis uniquely radical vision of the society we need to build, and the path to get there The Meaning of Freedom articulates a bold vision of the society we need to build and the path to get there This is her only book of speeches Davis arguments for justice are formidable The power of her historical insights and the sweetness of her dream cannot be denied The New York Times One of America s last truly fearless public intellectuals Cynthia McKinney, former US Congresswoman Angela Davis offers a cartography of engagement in oppositional social movements and unwavering commitment to justice Chandra Talpade Mohanty, Women s Studies, Hamilton College Angela Davis deserves credit, not just for the dignity and courage with which she has lived her life, but also for raising important critiques of a for profit penitentiary system decades before those arguments gained purchase in the mainstream Thomas Chatterton Williams, SFGate Angela Davis s revolutionary spirit is still strong Still with us, thank goodness Virginian Pilot Long before race gender became the obligatory injunction it is now, Angela Davis was developing an analytical framework that brought all of these factors into play For readers who only see Angela Davis as a public icon meet the real Angela Davis perhaps the leading public intellectual of our era Robin D G Kelley author of Thelonious Monk The Life and Times of an American Original There was a time in America when to call a person an abolitionist was the ultimate epithet It evoked scorn in the North and outrage in the South Yet they were the harbingers of things to come They were on the right side of history Prof Angela Y Davis stands in that proud, radical tradition Mumia Abu Jamal, author of Jailhouse Lawyers Prisoners Defending Prisoners v the U.S.A Behold the heart and mind of Angela Davis, open, relentless, and on time June Jordan Political activist, scholar, and author Angela Davis confronts the interconnected issues of power, race, gender, class, incarceration, conservatism, and the ongoing need for social change in the U.S in her book, The Meaning of Freedom And Other Difficult Dialogues Travis Smiley RadioAngela Y Davis is professor emerita at the University of California and author of eight books She is a much sought after public speaker and an internationally known advocate for social justice.Robin D.G Kelley is the author of numerous books and a professor at the University of Southern California.
    The Meaning of Freedom: And Other Difficult Dialogues By Angela Y. Davis Robin D.G. Kelley,
    • [KINDLE] Ï The Meaning of Freedom: And Other Difficult Dialogues | BY ☆ Angela Y. Davis Robin D.G. Kelley
      154 Angela Y. Davis Robin D.G. Kelley
    • thumbnail Title: [KINDLE] Ï The Meaning of Freedom: And Other Difficult Dialogues | BY ☆ Angela Y. Davis Robin D.G. Kelley
      Posted by:Angela Y. Davis Robin D.G. Kelley
      Published :2020-05-18T04:37:01+00:00

    About "Angela Y. Davis Robin D.G. Kelley"

    1. Angela Y. Davis Robin D.G. Kelley

      Angela Yvonne Davis is an American political activist, scholar, and author She emerged as a nationally prominent activist and radical in the 1960s, as a leader of the Communist Party USA, and had close relations with the Black Panther Party through her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement despite never being an official member of the party Prisoner rights have been among her continuing interests she is the founder of Critical Resistance, an organization working to abolish the prison industrial complex She is a retired professor with the History of Consciousness Department at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and is the former director of the university s Feminist Studies department.Her research interests are in feminism, African American studies, critical theory, Marxism, popular music, social consciousness, and the philosophy and history of punishment and prisons Her membership in the Communist Party led to Ronald Reagan s request in 1969 to have her barred from teaching at any university in the State of California She was tried and acquitted of suspected involvement in the Soledad brothers August 1970 abduction and murder of Judge Harold Haley in Marin County, California She was twice a candidate for Vice President on the Communist Party USA ticket during the 1980s.

    346 thoughts on “The Meaning of Freedom: And Other Difficult Dialogues”

    1. Racism, classism, ageism, sexism, activism, homophobia, racial profiling, rehabilitation vs punishment, big business prison systems this book covers it all The stories were written many years ago, yet they remain relevant in this year 2015 This book forces one to think about how each race, every person is touched by the aforementioned A great read.



    2. The title truly captures the essence of the essays included, The Meaning Of Freedom And Other Difficult Dialogues Dr Davis reminds us about the prison industrial complex, which is a form of punishment, punishment which imprisons predominately poor people of color She emphatically reminds us that those who go to prison are striped of their rights such as rights of disfranchisement The underlying cause of the prison industrial complex is capitalism and racism which have become institutionalized Fo [...]


    3. Prof Davis never disappoints Anyone who is truly interested in opening their mind to realities of activism, social justice and change must read Angela Davis Within the past year I have had the opportunity to learn from James Baldwin, bell hooks and Angela Y Davis This book was a perfect fit in the stream of learning for me Reading this book was like attending her lectures in person She narrates and teaches and passionately makes her knowledge and experiences available to all in this book.


    4. I was fortunate to hear Angela Davis speak in Oakland last year She is a passionate and awe inspiring person who has stayed true to her beliefs This book is a collection of speeches she gave between 2000 and 2010 or thereabouts While she covers similar ground in each speech it is articulated differently each time Age has not diminished her fire nor her intelligence, and I would go far out of my way to hear her speak again While I wait for that to happen, I have her words here that will continue [...]


    5. This is the second Angela Davis book I ve read I can t wait to read the rest She has a gift for stating powerful insights about race, class, gender, sexual orientation, citizenship, and most of all crime, punishment, and incarceration, in language that grabs you and forces you to pay attention This book was particularly interesting because it s structure a chronological collection of speeches allowed you to see the same themes recur and develop.


    6. For those unaware, many of these speeches are related to each other in topic and so you will bump into redundancies if you read it as you would a fiction novel I, personally, would recommend this to be read over time or in pieces to elimante reading fatigue and to allow yourself to really grasp what is being said.


    7. would have been four stars, but city lights really botched this one so many copy editing problems throughout the book including repeated paragraphs, random paragraph breaks, quotation marks repeated at random, etc davis is brilliant as always very accessible for non academic readers.


    8. Davis goes a long way in giving the tools of language, points of reference, an actually applicable paradigm Instead if a sea of confusion, as social justice works can often leave you with, she gives the reader tools for dialogue The title is perfect.



    9. We fight the same battles over and over again They are never won for eternity, but in the progress of struggling together, in community, we learn how to glimpse new possibilities that otherwise never would have become apparent to us, and in the process we expand and enlarge our very notion of freedom a collection of speeches that will sit with me for a very long time thank you davis, thank you.


    10. Books like this have changed my life Easily placing Davis on the forefront of black radical thought, this collection of essays is required reading for anyone wanting to learn about and interrogate liberation, oppression, and intersectional thinking.


    11. Mindblowing new insight on the definition of freedom and how slavery continues to transcend in our time A systematic oppression that many of us are unaware of.


    12. Two hundred years after the formal abolition of American slavery, Angela Davis stood before a crowd to give a speech entitled The Meaning of Freedom Consistent with her other speeches, The Meaning of Freedom implores her audience to broaden their understanding of slavery, servitude and institutionalized marginalization She guides her listeners in understanding how incomplete definitions of freedom allow for the continuation of other types of injustices Davis illustrates how democracies fail to r [...]


    13. A collection of various speeches from the 90 s through the 2000 s, Angela Davis challenges our notions of freedom what it truly means to be so in this country Is it enough to be able to participate in things as they are Is the status quo good for all or a few Does it truly allow us to be free A few things these speeches may force you to ponder She talks about the way we think about correction rehabilitation the connections between slavery the prison industrial complex She also talks about role g [...]


    14. Booklist Online This book is a collection of Davis lectures from 1994 through 2009, interweaving themes of freedom and bias based on race, gender, and sexual orientation Davis is at her best linking these perceptively separate segments into a broader concept of freedom across all the lines that separate us Vernon FordBust Magazine Angela Y Davis proves that it s still possible to find a new, refreshing way to discuss race, gender, class, and sexuality In this heartfelt examination through previo [...]


    15. A powerful and diverse collection of Angela Davis s speeches over the course of about ten years Angela Davis is a brilliant and fierce mind The writing style is particularly clear and succinct due to the nature of the medium speeches, rather than essays I also found this collection to be particularly emotional at times because of the speeches historical significance s , as Davis was called to speak in the context of various social political historical events, though often touching on the same th [...]


    16. I must say that I bought this book because of the cover I was hoping to see Davis reflect her recent travels to Palestine in her discussion of freedom and imprisonment Unfortunately, I think there were only 1 or 2 references to Palestine in this collection of speeches In any case, it was nice to read some recent writing about her prison abolition work I do think and hope that she will widen this discussion to include Palestine, especially given how much the prison industrial complex is in cahoot [...]


    17. This is a collection of lectures from a lady that belongs to the many of the less fortunate groups she is a woman, she is black, and she is a communist However, she is so brilliant that she keeps being invited to speak at all kinds of venues, and her discourse is really interesting, though nothing different from a lot of good people out there I hope that she keeps her success and at some point she is able to witness a better world according to her dreams and ideals.



    18. This was a spectacular read Davis examines the different forms of oppression political, cultural, sexual that continue to exist, despite apparent equality the inter sectional themes of race, class, gender, power religious conservatism and pries open a new way of looking at these issues A must read


    19. Well, wow This book is entirely compelling and has totally changed the way I understand punishment and imprisonment, especially and most obviously with regard to people of colour, as well as other minority and marginalised groups I think this is absolutely essential feminist reading.I m sure I ll come back and write a fuller review once I ve sat with my thoughts a little longer.


    20. exceptional treatise on modern structural racism as it stands apart from overt jim crow racism mostly as it is perpetuated by the global prison industrial complex, though other aspects are covered she speaks truth to how the world works, similar to noam chomsky in this regard definitely need to read of hers


    21. I was worried I came to this book too late, but Davis clearly and compellingly outlines the contemporary contours of American racism, capitalism, and carcerality and the perverse ways they intersect.




    Leave a Comment

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *