The Untouched Key: Tracing Childhood Trauma in Creativity and Destructiveness

The Untouched Key: Tracing Childhood Trauma in Creativity and Destructiveness By AliceMiller Hunter Hannum Hildegarde Hannum, The Untouched Key Tracing Childhood Trauma in Creativity and Destructiveness As in her former books Alice Miller again focuses on facts She is as determined as ever to cut through the veil that for thousands of years now has been so meticulously woven to shroud the truth Wh
  • Title: The Untouched Key: Tracing Childhood Trauma in Creativity and Destructiveness
  • Author: AliceMiller Hunter Hannum Hildegarde Hannum
  • ISBN: 9780385267649
  • Page: 301
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Untouched Key: Tracing Childhood Trauma in Creativity and Destructiveness By AliceMiller Hunter Hannum Hildegarde Hannum, As in her former books, Alice Miller again focuses on facts She is as determined as ever to cut through the veil that, for thousands of years now, has been so meticulously woven to shroud the truth When she lifts that veil and brushes it aside, the results are astonishing, amply demonstrated by her analyses of the works of Nietzsche, Picasso, Kathe Kollwitz, Buster KeatoAs in her former books, Alice Miller again focuses on facts She is as determined as ever to cut through the veil that, for thousands of years now, has been so meticulously woven to shroud the truth When she lifts that veil and brushes it aside, the results are astonishing, amply demonstrated by her analyses of the works of Nietzsche, Picasso, Kathe Kollwitz, Buster Keaton, and others With the key shunned by so many for so long childhood she opens rusty locks and offers her readers a wealth of unexpected perspectives What did Picasso express in Guernica Why did Buster Keaton never smile Why did Nietzsche heap so much opprobrium on women and religion and lose his mind for 11 years Why did Hitler and Stalin become tyrannical mass murderers Miller investigates these and other questions thoroughly in this book She draws from her discoveries that human beings are not innately destructive, that they are made that way by ignorance, abuse, and neglect, particularly if no sympathetic witness comes to their aid She also shows why some mistreated children do not become criminals, but instead bear witness as artists to the truth about their childhoods, even though in purely intuitive and unconscious ways.
    The Untouched Key: Tracing Childhood Trauma in Creativity and Destructiveness By AliceMiller Hunter Hannum Hildegarde Hannum,
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    About "AliceMiller Hunter Hannum Hildegarde Hannum"

    1. AliceMiller Hunter Hannum Hildegarde Hannum

      Librarian Note There is than one author by this name in the database.Psychologist and world renowned author, who is noted for her books on child abuse, translated in several languages In her books she departed from psychoanalysis charging it with being similar to the poisonous pedagogies, which she described in For Your Own Good Miller was born in Poland and as young woman lived in Warshaw where she survived World War II In 1953 she gained her doctorate in philosophy, psychology and sociology at University of Basel in Switzerland For the next 20 years Miller studied and practiced psychoanalysis Her first three books originated from research she took upon herself as a response to what she felt were major blind spots in her field However, by the time her fourth book was published, she no longer believed that psychoanalysis was viable in any respect Miller extended trauma model to include all forms of child abuse, including those that were commonly accepted such as spanking , which she called poisonous pedagogy, a non literal translation of Katharina Rutschky s Schwarze P dagogik black or dark pedagogy Drawing upon the work of psychohistory, Miller analyzed writers Virginia Woolf, Franz Kafka and others to find links between their childhood traumas and the course and outcome of their lives.In 1979, she stopped practicing as a psychoanalyst after having studied and practiced psychoanalysis for 20 years and became critical of both Freud and Carl Jung She has continued to write and lecture on psychological issues Her most recent book, Pictures of My Life, was published in 2006 an informal autobiography in which the writer explores her emotional process from painful childhood, through the development of her theories and later insights, told via the display and discussion of 66 of her original paintings, painted in the years 1973 to 2005.She died in April 14th 2010 in Saint R my de Provence, France.

    776 thoughts on “The Untouched Key: Tracing Childhood Trauma in Creativity and Destructiveness”

    1. The subtitle of this book is Tracing Childhood Trauma in Creativity and Destructiveness The premise of this book is that a child can endure any kind of trauma if he or she has a witness, that is, a person who supports the child emotionally or sympathizes with the plight of the child even if that person cannot change events When children are traumatized by cruel child rearing practices, external events such as war, or outright abuse and they have no sympathizing witness, it creates evil and Alice [...]


    2. This book probably would have made a marginally interesting dissertation for a dual Ph.D major in art and psychology But it lacks footnotes and citations, which irks me to no end The basis on which the book rests can be aptly summed up with Miller s own quote I wanted to share what I had found with biographers and pscyhoanalysts, but I soon learned that I was dealing with forbidden knowledge, by no means easy to share with the experts And so I decided not to publish my study but to keep the know [...]



    3. If you haven t read this book, you don t understand anything about anything.I d love to hear her thoughts on every art piece ever created




    4. Why do some children who suffer a troubling childhood become brutal monsters like Adolf Hitler whilst others appear to develop into highly sensitive people capable of expressing their suffering via creative pursuits This is the question Miller attempts to answer as she explores the childhoods of the likes of Picasso,, Kathe Kollwitz, Buster Keaton, Hitler, Soutine and Friedrich Nietzsche.Miller s work has been criticised for its lack of evidence and indeed many of her conclusions are based on sp [...]


    5. Este libro es una joya de la psicolog a en el rea del maltrato infantil y su repercusi n en la vida adulta Se explota un tema ya muy conocido y persistentemente ignorado acerca del impacto de las experiencias tempranas sobre la psicopatolog a del individuo Alice Miller nos plantea el sufrimiento infantil como eje para el rumbo que toma el mundo Cuestiona temas casi sagrados como la veneraci n ciega a los mayores, d ndole un giro a la m tica historia del sacrificio de Abraham Nos recuerda lo cieg [...]


    6. This book is primarily concerned with the work and history of select individuals, for the sake of illustrating that themes of trauma persist into adult life, through both acts of creativity and destructiveness Miller looks at Pablo Picasso, Buster Keaton, Friedrich Nietzsche, and others, analyzing their works and actions, while pointing towards traumatic themes that she believes are evidenced in the history of these individuals Miller is critical of many of these individual s biographers, whom s [...]


    7. WIth utmost respect to Alice Miller s gifts to the world, Drama of the Gifted Child is really the only one of her books that is crucial to read The others, including The Untouched Key, seem to differently package the same ideas Though to her credit, The Untouched Key sparked in me an interest in reading biographies though I m perennially disappointed by an almost universal lack of insightful explorations into early childhood.


    8. An introduction to the repercussions of childhood on adult creativity, a short and accessible read which raises many questions But as another reviewer mentioned, there is a lack of footnotes and sources to back up her findings into the family constructs of the subjects of her study The book has a subjective and conversational tone which calls into question the validity of Miller s conclusions on the lives she examines.


    9. A compelling review of historical figures whose childhood experiences and traumas are purported to have shaped them into who they were The implications are both terrible and wonderful and Alice Miller makes a strong case as a lone voice at the time she wrote this Her own story and biases are evident but are not made explicit, which results in a four star book receiving a three star review.


    10. MUY bueno para entender las obras de Nietzsche, Picasso, Kafka y otros Todo, a la luz de sus vivencias, din micas familiares y traumas infantiles Sobre las fuentes de la investigaci n de Alice Miller, creo que s le falt seriedad pero toda la informaci n es comprobable si hacemos un poco de investigaci n


    11. Very interesting read Alice looks at the paintings of some artists and the writings of Nietchie and analyses them based on what she knows about their childhoods Miller then ends the book by stating that people with non violent childhoods will grow up secure and able to nurture their own children and won t need to use the threat of war as a way to negotiate with other nations.


    12. Miller dives into the childhoods and works of Nietzsche, Picasso, Stalin others, and tries to trace back the mistakes of their parents which resulted in genius philosophy outstanding art human disasters Once again, as it is often the case with Miller, her meticulous process is fascinating and final findings are shady.


    13. Absolutely riveting little book about the pattern of pain imposed by parents on children and what it does to the world A brilliantly succinct distillation of MIller s lifetime of work The closing section on Abraham and Isaac is heartbreaking in the width of its perspective Deepen your path to healing yourself and the world read this book.








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