Within the Whirlwind

Within the Whirlwind By Evgenia Ginzburg Ian Boland Heinrich Böll, Within the Whirlwind The first volume of Eugenia Ginzburg s memoirs Journey into the Whirlwind has been ranked in the company of Solzhenitsyn s The Gulag Archipelago Within the Whirlwind continues the narrative of Mrs G
  • Title: Within the Whirlwind
  • Author: Evgenia Ginzburg Ian Boland Heinrich Böll
  • ISBN: 9780151975174
  • Page: 339
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Within the Whirlwind By Evgenia Ginzburg Ian Boland Heinrich Böll, The first volume of Eugenia Ginzburg s memoirs, Journey into the Whirlwind, has been ranked in the company of Solzhenitsyn s The Gulag Archipelago Within the Whirlwind continues the narrative of Mrs Ginzburg s nightmarish ten year survival of Soviet prisons and labor camps, following the Stalinist purges of 1937 This portion of her story is especially memorable for itsThe first volume of Eugenia Ginzburg s memoirs, Journey into the Whirlwind, has been ranked in the company of Solzhenitsyn s The Gulag Archipelago Within the Whirlwind continues the narrative of Mrs Ginzburg s nightmarish ten year survival of Soviet prisons and labor camps, following the Stalinist purges of 1937 This portion of her story is especially memorable for its portrayal of her relationship with another prisoner, a German Catholic doctor, who became her second husband a love that transcended every obstacle and the most inhuman of circumstancesrs Ginzburg is revealed here as a woman of outstanding courage and charity, as well as an incomparable chronicler of humanity.
    Within the Whirlwind By Evgenia Ginzburg Ian Boland Heinrich Böll,
    • [☆ Within the Whirlwind || ↠ PDF Read by ↠ Evgenia Ginzburg Ian Boland Heinrich Böll]
      339 Evgenia Ginzburg Ian Boland Heinrich Böll
    • thumbnail Title: [☆ Within the Whirlwind || ↠ PDF Read by ↠ Evgenia Ginzburg Ian Boland Heinrich Böll]
      Posted by:Evgenia Ginzburg Ian Boland Heinrich Böll
      Published :2020-02-13T20:38:08+00:00

    About "Evgenia Ginzburg Ian Boland Heinrich Böll"

    1. Evgenia Ginzburg Ian Boland Heinrich Böll

      Yevgenia Ginzburg Russian language was a Russian historian and writer Her latinized name Eugenia is frequently used in the West.Soon after Yevgenia Ginzburg was born into the family of a Jewish pharmacist in Moscow, her family moved to Kazan In 1920 she entered the social sciences department of Kazan State University, later switching to pedagogy.She worked as a rabfak , , worker s faculty teacher, then as an assistant at the University Shortly thereafter, she married Pavel Aksyonov, the mayor of Kazan and a member of the Central Executive Committee of the USSR After becoming a Communist Party member, Ginzburg continued her successful career as educator, journalist and administrator Her oldest son, Alexei Fedorov, from her first marriage to Doctor Fedorov, was born in 1926 and died in the Great Patriotic War Her younger son Vasily Aksyonov, born in 1932, went on to become a famous writer.In February 1937, she was expelled from the party ranks and soon arrested for her alleged connections to the Trotskyists See also Great Purge Her parents were also arrested but released two months later Her husband was arrested in July and sentenced to 15 years of corrective labor with the confiscation of his property Articles 58 7 and 11 In August, Yevgenia was also sentenced to ten years.Yevgenia experienced first hand the infamous Moscow Lefortovo and Butyrka prisons, the Yaroslavl Korovniki , as well as the journey on a prison train across the country to Vladivostok, and finally to Kolyma in the cargo hold of the steamer Jurma At Magadan, she worked at a camp hospital, but was soon sent into the cold depths of the Gulag and assigned to so called common jobs, where she quickly became an emaciated dokhodyaga goner A Crimean German doctor, Anton Walter, probably saved her life by recommending her for a nursing position Anton had been deported due to his German heritage, Yevgenia due to her allegedly critical attitude to the Soviet system They married later 1 In February 1949, Ginzburg was formally released but had to stay in Magadan for five years She found a position at a kindergarten and secretly started to work on her memoirs In October 1950 she was arrested again and exiled to Krasnoyarsk region, but before she left, her destination was changed to Kolyma After Stalin s death in 1953, Ginzburg was able to visit Moscow and was fully rehabilitated in 1955, as were millions of wrongly convicted, many posthumously.She returned to Moscow, worked as a reporter and continued her work on her magnum opus memoir, Journey into the Whirlwind English title After the book was completed 1967 , all attempts to publish it in the USSR failed for political reasons and the manuscript was smuggled abroad, where it was widely published Eventually, her book included 2 parts, in original Russian named Krutoi marshrut I and Krutoi marshrut II Harsh Route or Steep Route.

    519 thoughts on “Within the Whirlwind”

    1. It wasn t easy to finish this book After reading Into the Whirlwind it was hard to bear blows to Eugenia s life one guard sends her back to tree felling, the other one on a walk across the taiga, a walk that lets her contemplate suicide But the rewards of going all the way to the last page were stunning Her descriptions of her time in the children s house just what I need for my research Or this quote For the first time in several years I found myself alone in a room The distant voices and the [...]


    2. Just as amazing as the first part of her memoir, Journey into the Whirlwind Ginzburg can x ray people s souls, and, somehow, just as the first part, this book is full of humor and even hope A must read for anyone who s interested in Russian history and, broadly, in humanity to what incredible heights it can soar and to what abysmal depths it can fall.


    3. I love reading the Russian names of people and places, and about the humanity of the people, even in the midst of Stalin s Great Purge It did drag a little in the middle the unremitting suffering and travails she endured but gained new life with the death of The Great One and motored along excitedly to its conclusion I enjoy reading stories of human fortitude.


    4. A solid sequel to Ginzburg s first book, Journey into the Whirlwind I had been unaware of this book when I read the first and wondered why the first book had ended so abruptly now I realize these books are really meant to be two volumes of the same work I suppose they need not necessarily be read together there is a three page section at the beginning of this second book that summarizes the events of the first But I think reading them together, and in order, certainly enriches the experience.Her [...]


    5. An exhausting but profound read More contemplative in tone and content than Journey into the Whirlwind, but retaining Ginzburg s striking blend of understatement and frankness, Within the Whirlwind chronicles the darkest days of her imprisonment in the Kolyma camps, her subsequent exile, and her eventual rehabilitation In both content and style this memoir has few rivals I look forward to comparing it with Shalamov s Kolyma Tales, my next read What impressed itself upon me the most, however, is [...]


    6. I never cease to be amazed by the stories of those who survived the Gulag One unique aspect of her story is how she described the immediate change that occurred when Stalin died She, and really the entire country, experienced a profound sense of new hope, even though communism continued for another forty years There is a scene late in the book where she is in a cafe in Moscow, talking with old friends that had also survived exile, when a group of college students overhears them and is moved to t [...]


    7. Very good read Not a quick read for me I thought her first volume, Into the Whirlwind , was a lot easier read Eugenia s story is a part of the Gulag biographies that came out of Stalinist Russia More people died at the hands of Joseph Stalin than Adolfo Hitler by far Stalin was a brutal butcher in the name of political ideology and really a cruel man It staggers the imagination to witness the atrocities committed in the name of social progress.


    8. I read the spanish version which brings both volumes in one book of 450 pages Not even Tolkien could imagine such a journey of 18 years In my opinion, the most interesting is the beginning and the end where she falls into the trap and when she gets out of hell, full of insights on her sincere feelings.


    9. Excellent But I thought her other book, Journey Into the Whirlwind, was even better It moved faster and was even personal to meL


    10. her two books are amazing to me her incredible memory and writing about this terrible period in her and her country s life will stay with me for a long time.







    Leave a Comment

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *